One brief shining moment that was known as People Power

I was there 25 years ago with a contingent of UP Law students that manned the barricades. We were in the night shift. I was with a paralegal quick reaction team that was directed to go to Malacañang when news filtered in that people were looting the palace. What we were supposed to do as paralegals, I can’t remember. What I remember was that I was driving, the streets were on fire (abandoned bonfires? molotov cocktails?) and we turned back.

Despite the attempts to drum up interest in the 25th anniversary of the EDSA People Power, I was unmoved. Although I will always feel a certain amount of pride in being part of the historic moment that threw out a dictator, I have no illusions. For some people, booting out Marcos was the only purpose of People Power; I was hoping for more. I was hoping for real change. And I was disappointed. Perhaps, I should have known better than to expect real change when the people who replaced Marcos were all part of the same elite that has maintained the lopsided economic power distribution in the country.

I had no love nor admiration for Ninoy Aquino and I took no part in the mass actions that followed his death. I did not go to his wake, I did not join his funeral march. I agree with F. Sionil Jose who wrote:

Ninoy Aquino was a politician, a skilled opportunist. He returned not so much because he was needed here but because Marcos was very ill; he knew that it was time for him to return and fill the vacuum of leadership if Marcos died or was displaced by political mass action, Ninoy was the anointed successor; he had charisma, a vast following, friends in the Army, and a political machine. He had miscalculated. He was courageous, but that courage was opportunism, too. True heroism is selfless. He was murdered, not martyred.

It was only after the COMELEC officials walked out while tabulating that results of the 1986 snap elections that I took notice of Cory Aquino, her growing influence, aware that she was at the right place at the perfect time to boot out Marcos. She was serendipity personified and I was not oblivious to it. For one shining moment, we had a chance for real change and greatness, Cory blew it and the country stood by and let her because, after Marcos, anything sounded better.

Where are we now? We have a president who shares the same surname as the man who got murdered in his attempt to capture the presidency and the woman who thwarted genuine agrarian reform by allowing the law to be amended so that the family-owned hacienda could be exempted from expropriation. Our current president was elected not because he was qualified but because his campaign was hinged on the memory of his parents whose only lasting contribution to history was to be against a hated dictator and to be hated right back by him.

So, no, I did not go on a nostalgic trip down memory lane these last days. And, yesterday, 25 years after Marcos fled the country, we were in the movie house watching Unknown. Fitting, I must say, because after 25 years, where this country’s heading is still unknown. The Philippines is still a boat without a rudder. Twenty-five years after People Power, it is still unknown who the real patriots and statesmen are, and who are wolves in sheep’s clothing. We’re still a poor country and we’re still being duped by politicians and their handlers. Political dynasties and cronyism are very much alive and kicking.

What was there to celebrate? Marcos’ widow tried to win the presidency, lost twice, but managed to win a seat in Congress. If anyone thought that the Marcos influence was limited their home provinces of Imelda (Leyte) and the late dictator (Ilocos), the 2010 senatorial elections proved that wrong when Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr. placed seventh in the senatorial elections. I wouldn’t be surprised if in 2016, the presidential race is a three-cornered fight among Marcos, Bong Revilla and Jinggoy Estrada. What a nightmare.

Was there at least something I learned from People Power? Oh, yes.

1. Most Filipinos have a short memory.

2. Most Filipinos don’t know their political history.

3. Most Filipinos are blindly forgiving.

That said, why don’t just I write about Unknown? Sure, the plot is preposterous — a Middle Eastern prince financing a biotech project to grow corn faster and anywhere and giving the unpatented formula to the world for FREE. But the pace and performances are so great that the film is riveting and enjoyable nonetheless. And the best part? What was unknown for most of the film became known during the last 20 minutes. At least, there’s a happy ending and a clear closure. Can’t say the same about the reality of this country. But then again, that’s what separates reality from fiction. And at least I can tell the difference.

58 thoughts on “One brief shining moment that was known as People Power

  • February 26, 2011 at 4:24 pm
    Permalink

    a good life drama usually wins the election

    Reply
    • February 26, 2011 at 4:30 pm
      Permalink

      I hate talking politics w/ my family members. they’re the type of people will not think anything bad of the Aquinos. They hate GMA, they love Erap. They hate Marcos.
      I don’t want to say that they have “MASA thinking” but sometimes I really don’t get why there are so blindsighted.
      I on the other hand think of them all as human beings w/ their own faults, and they all have their own pros and cons when they were in power. Not everyone sees the same way I do so I just shut up so as not to get any arguments where its 20:1.

      Reply
    • February 26, 2011 at 5:23 pm
      Permalink

      Haaay! We just watched this and it was completely ruined for me because Woody speculated out-loud during the middle of the movie. It quickly became clear that he was right. Knowing what was coming really took away a lot of my enjoyment from the film. Blech.

      Reply
      • February 26, 2011 at 7:25 pm
        Permalink

        We the people are both the problem and the answer .

        Reply
      • February 26, 2011 at 7:44 pm
        Permalink

        Yup yup, same old same old.Local businesses are still controlled by politician families.Government service still means getting rich from stealing and cheating.The executive,legislative and judiciary is still rotten and beseiged by padrinos,kickbacks,quid pro quos and fixing. The ‘masa’ are still being made ‘uto-uto’ by celebrities.. votes are still being bought and sold. SK is grooming the next generation of greedy,unpatriotic and opportunist politicians. EDSA or no-EDSA, Marcos dictator or not, Ninoy hero or not…the truth doesn’t really matter.it’s the perception of the truth.we need something ‘game-changing’ ala China or Brazil perhaps..

        Reply
        • February 26, 2011 at 10:39 pm
          Permalink

          I see your point. At least in the movie, what was unknown gets revealed in the last 20 minutes of its playtime compared to where the country is heading to right now. Marcos really never left us – it’s all around us and it takes more than scrubbing – that is the sad part of it.

          Reply
      • February 27, 2011 at 11:17 am
        Permalink

        that’s you. for people born after 1986, edsa means a lot; you and your countless posts would not have made it here if it weren’t for edsa. that’s a change worth celebrating. Mabuhay ang Pilipino!

        Reply
        • February 27, 2011 at 11:48 am
          Permalink

          Same old, same old.

          That’s why I also agree with F. Sionil Jose when he said a few years back during the height of the Hello, Garci controversy: “Now I want a revolution!”

          He wasn’t referring to People Power of any episode. But along the lines of the 1896 revolution and instead of taking out foreign rulers, he mean taking out the ruling elite.

          Reply
          • February 27, 2011 at 12:34 pm
            Permalink

            “taking out the ruling elite”

            Now that sounds like espousing communism but take away the negative labeling and it is so true!

          • February 27, 2011 at 3:42 pm
            Permalink

            Why does the mention of revolution that in a politico/ social context automatically means the removal of the current ruling elite , have to mean you espouse communism? After all The Velvet Revolution in the then Czechoslovakia was was premised on removing a communist dictatorship , the American Revolution was premised on removing a dictatorship , of sorts , of the British Royal family and a parliament within which the colonies had no representation . So revolution doesn’t always mean espousing communism. And remember one reason the NPA has failed to bring about a communist take over in The Philippines is because it doesn’t have the support of the people . And as Mao said that support , along the power from the barrel of a gun , is essential for success.

          • February 27, 2011 at 5:19 pm
            Permalink

            “have to mean you espouse communism”

            In the Philippines, yes, because it is also the platform of the Communist Party. :sad: You can’t even mention “cultural revolution” here without people labeling you as Red. And in a Catholic country where communism is tagged as anti-God, oh heck… you can just imagine why people are so resistant to systemic changes and are quite content with a changing of the guards every election.

        • February 27, 2011 at 12:32 pm
          Permalink

          LOL Rhetoric. For you who wasn’t even there, how can you even compare. Tsk tsk. WHAT CHANGE?

          Me and my countless posts are here because the internet and blogging were invented.

          Reply
          • February 28, 2011 at 5:05 pm
            Permalink

            “Me and my countless posts are here because the internet and blogging were invented.”

            LOL. Exactly.

  • February 26, 2011 at 10:42 pm
    Permalink

    I am happy, but more sad, that somebody actually thinks exactly what I have been thinking all along. Happy that atleast somebody else sees it for what it is, but sadder that after all, this is the country and the society we Filipinos created.

    We are in need of REAL HEROES. Since the time of Bonifacio and Aguinaldo, we have had politics permeated with deceit, greed and desire for self-aggrandizement. The elite has a monopoly of government.

    I died a little (read: a lot) when Bong Bong Marcos got elected to the Senate. How can people forget? His ambition does not stop at being senator. He WANTS TO BE PRESIDENT. Sadly, the same people who voted for jinggoy, revilla, lapid, and let’s not forget Erap, who next to NoyNoy got the second highest vote in the most recent election, plunder conviction notwithstanding!

    Reply
    • February 26, 2011 at 11:19 pm
      Permalink

      Edited:

      Sadly, the same people who voted for jinggoy, revilla, lapid and let’s not forget Erap, who next to NoyNoy got the second highest vote in the most recent election, plunder conviction notwithstanding, will be the same people who will vote for BongBong to be president! We get the government we deserve.

      Reply
  • February 27, 2011 at 12:24 am
    Permalink

    a good life drama usually wins the election

    Reply
  • February 27, 2011 at 12:30 am
    Permalink

    I hate talking politics w/ my family members. they're the type of people will not think anything bad of the Aquinos. They hate GMA, they love Erap. They hate Marcos.
    I don't want to say that they have "MASA thinking" but sometimes I really don't get why there are so blindsighted.
    I on the other hand think of them all as human beings w/ their own faults, and they all have their own pros and cons when they were in power. Not everyone sees the same way I do so I just shut up so as not to get any arguments where its 20:1.

    Reply
  • February 27, 2011 at 1:23 am
    Permalink

    Haaay! We just watched this and it was completely ruined for me because Woody speculated out-loud during the middle of the movie. It quickly became clear that he was right. Knowing what was coming really took away a lot of my enjoyment from the film. Blech.

    Reply
    • February 27, 2011 at 3:25 am
      Permalink

      We the people are both the problem and the answer .

      Reply
  • February 27, 2011 at 3:44 am
    Permalink

    Yup yup, same old same old.Local businesses are still controlled by politician families.Government service still means getting rich from stealing and cheating.The executive,legislative and judiciary is still rotten and beseiged by padrinos,kickbacks,quid pro quos and fixing. The 'masa' are still being made 'uto-uto' by celebrities.. votes are still being bought and sold. SK is grooming the next generation of greedy,unpatriotic and opportunist politicians. EDSA or no-EDSA, Marcos dictator or not, Ninoy hero or not…the truth doesn't really matter.it's the perception of the truth.we need something 'game-changing' ala China or Brazil perhaps..

    Reply
  • February 27, 2011 at 6:39 am
    Permalink

    I see your point. At least in the movie, what was unknown gets revealed in the last 20 minutes of its playtime compared to where the country is heading to right now. Marcos really never left us – it's all around us and it takes more than scrubbing – that is the sad part of it.

    Reply
  • February 27, 2011 at 6:42 am
    Permalink

    I am happy, but more sad, that somebody actually thinks exactly what I have been thinking all along. Happy that atleast somebody else sees it for what it is, but sadder that after all, this is the country and the society we Filipinos created.

    We are in need of REAL HEROES. Since the time of Bonifacio and Aguinaldo, we have had politics permeated with deceit, greed and desire for self-aggrandizement. The elite has a monopoly of government.

    I died a little (read: a lot) when Bong Bong Marcos got elected to the Senate. How can people forget? His ambition does not stop at being senator. He WANTS TO BE PRESIDENT. Sadly, the same people who voted for jinggoy, revilla, lapid, and let's not forget Erap, who next to NoyNoy got the second highest vote in the most recent election, plunder conviction notwithstanding!

    Reply
    • February 27, 2011 at 7:19 am
      Permalink

      Edited:

      Sadly, the same people who voted for jinggoy, revilla, lapid and let's not forget Erap, who next to NoyNoy got the second highest vote in the most recent election, plunder conviction notwithstanding, will be the same people who will vote for BongBong to be president! We get the government we deserve.

      Reply
  • February 27, 2011 at 7:17 pm
    Permalink

    that's you. for people born after 1986, edsa means a lot; you and your countless posts would not have made it here if it weren't for edsa. that's a change worth celebrating. Mabuhay ang Pilipino!

    Reply
    • February 27, 2011 at 8:32 pm
      Permalink

      LOL Rhetoric. For you who wasn't even there, how can you even compare. Tsk tsk. WHAT CHANGE?

      Me and my countless posts are here because the internet and blogging were invented.

      Reply
      • March 1, 2011 at 1:05 am
        Permalink

        "Me and my countless posts are here because the internet and blogging were invented."

        LOL. Exactly.

        Reply
  • February 27, 2011 at 7:48 pm
    Permalink

    Same old, same old.

    That's why I also agree with F. Sionil Jose when he said a few years back during the height of the Hello, Garci controversy: "Now I want a revolution!"

    He wasn't referring to People Power of any episode. But along the lines of the 1896 revolution and instead of taking out foreign rulers, he mean taking out the ruling elite.

    Reply
    • February 27, 2011 at 8:34 pm
      Permalink

      "taking out the ruling elite"

      Now that sounds like espousing communism but take away the negative labeling and it is so true!

      Reply
      • February 27, 2011 at 11:42 pm
        Permalink

        Why does the mention of revolution that in a politico/ social context automatically means the removal of the current ruling elite , have to mean you espouse communism? After all The Velvet Revolution in the then Czechoslovakia was was premised on removing a communist dictatorship , the American Revolution was premised on removing a dictatorship , of sorts , of the British Royal family and a parliament within which the colonies had no representation . So revolution doesn't always mean espousing communism. And remember one reason the NPA has failed to bring about a communist take over in The Philippines is because it doesn't have the support of the people . And as Mao said that support , along the power from the barrel of a gun , is essential for success.

        Reply
        • February 28, 2011 at 1:19 am
          Permalink

          "have to mean you espouse communism"

          In the Philippines, yes, because it is also the platform of the Communist Party. :sad: You can't even mention "cultural revolution" here without people labeling you as Red. And in a Catholic country where communism is tagged as anti-God, oh heck… you can just imagine why people are so resistant to systemic changes and are quite content with a changing of the guards every election.

          Reply
  • February 27, 2011 at 9:16 pm
    Permalink

    To get out of this rut, we need something ‘revolutionary’ that’s for sure. As to what form and shape, is not an easy answer. The feudal lords in Congress, in our present system, has put a stranglehold on the country.
    Case in point:
    A law banning the publishing of politician’s names in government projects will never be passed.It’s always campaign season.The poor ‘masa’ thinks the money came from their congressman and is indebted to them forever.
    We are hostaged both by the system and by these unpatriotic, greedy opportunists.So much for People Power!!

    Reply
    • February 28, 2011 at 7:16 am
      Permalink

      EDSA may not have worked – our democratic institutions are dysfunctional and the economy deteriorated over time caused by mismanagement for lack of clear direction due to immature political system.

      However, the spirit of EDSA did live on – it is in a form of a democratic government where citizens can demand a genuine change, transparency and accountability at any time without having to fear the government trampling our rights. It gives us plenty of chances to change for the better.

      Time can only tell when people wakes up one day realizing that EDSA was not complete. We needed to expect more from our present day leaders by lifting our standards of expectation from them – and that means our votes should not be swayed very easily because of the utang na loob and beggar mindset every time they pull a Willie during elections.

      Reply
      • February 28, 2011 at 9:02 am
        Permalink

        so true.. and really so sad…
        hypothetical question ms connie? if you were to run for president.. why should people elect you? and if you were to make a film or a tv program, what would you write about? :-) curious lang po xx

        Reply
        • February 28, 2011 at 1:12 pm
          Permalink

          Naku, I wouldn’t run for president.

          “if you were to make… a tv program”

          Ah I’d revive Travel Time but with more focus on culture. I’d love for Filipinos to learn about regional traits and differences and learn to understand and accept them.

          “if you were to make a film…”

          Now, that is something we’ve talked about in passing here at home. Speedy and I can produce, Sam and Alex can execute… :)

          Reply
  • February 28, 2011 at 5:16 am
    Permalink

    To get out of this rut, we need something 'revolutionary' that's for sure. As to what form and shape, is not an easy answer. The feudal lords in Congress, in our present system, has put a stranglehold on the country.
    Case in point:
    A law banning the publishing of politician's names in government projects will never be passed.It's always campaign season.The poor 'masa' thinks the money came from their congressman and is indebted to them forever.
    We are hostaged both by the system and by these unpatriotic, greedy opportunists.So much for People Power!!

    Reply
  • February 28, 2011 at 3:16 pm
    Permalink

    EDSA may not have worked – our democratic institutions are dysfunctional and the economy deteriorated over time caused by mismanagement for lack of clear direction due to immature political system.

    However, the spirit of EDSA did live on – it is in a form of a democratic government where citizens can demand a genuine change, transparency and accountability at any time without having to fear the government trampling our rights. It gives us plenty of chances to change for the better.

    Time can only tell when people wakes up one day realizing that EDSA was not complete. We needed to expect more from our present day leaders by lifting our standards of expectation from them – and that means our votes should not be swayed very easily because of the utang na loob and beggar mindset every time they pull a Willie during elections.

    Reply
  • February 28, 2011 at 5:02 pm
    Permalink

    so true.. and really so sad…
    hypothetical question ms connie? if you were to run for president.. why should people elect you? and if you were to make a film or a tv program, what would you write about? :-) curious lang po xx

    Reply
    • February 28, 2011 at 9:12 pm
      Permalink

      Naku, I wouldn't run for president.

      "if you were to make… a tv program"

      Ah I'd revive Travel Time but with more focus on culture. I'd love for Filipinos to learn about regional traits and differences and learn to understand and accept them.

      "if you were to make a film…"

      Now, that is something we've talked about in passing here at home. Speedy and I can produce, Sam and Alex can execute… :)

      Reply
  • February 28, 2011 at 8:30 pm
    Permalink

    My sentiments exactly, Miss Connie. Bravo! Yearly, I ask myself “What is there to celebrate about EDSA?”. What have we got to show for it? Wala! Wala! Wala!

    Reply
    • March 13, 2011 at 9:10 pm
      Permalink

      Ms. Connie, it’s been a long time since I read your blog, hehe just want you to know. People Power?… What people power?.. As the other people who commented on this blog, I do not feel it. Same old, same old.. We don’t need a hero to stand up for us, we just need the people of the Philippines to have the political will to stand up for their right. I know it is easier said than done. Na sa atin lang naman kasi diba yung susi ng pag babago.

      (Comment about the current President)
      Sabi ng kakilala ko na militar, si Mar Roxas naman daw talaga nagpapatakbo ng Pilipinas, puppet lang daw si PNoy at apat na oras lang daw nilalagi ni PNoy sa Malacañang. At si VP Binay na daw papalit sa current Pres. because, alam nyo na.. May mangyayari nanaman na something. Parang sa panahon lang ni Erap.

      Reply
      • April 29, 2011 at 3:56 am
        Permalink

        Dear Connie,
        I am a student in the US taking a Philippine culture class, and my thought about the voting process with utang Na loob is the Filipino needs to look beyond a public bridge or roadway and look at values and consistency of policy.
        Let not your heart be troubled, we, too, have corruption here in the US gov. and do you want to know the sad part about it? I did a presentation on voter turn out at the polls on average mid term elections and do you know what I found? Only 22% of registered voters actually voted. Our presidential election in 2008 60% of registered voters voted. I don’t know if this is the case in the Philippines as well but a change will not happen if one sits at home and waits for the wrong person to take office to complain about it. Vote! Vote! Vote! It is your right and urge others to do the same. Change does not come easy and I don’t have to tell Filipino’s that! It can be done educate and reinstate!!!!!
        Keep informing people Miss Connie it is people like you that will bring change!

        Reply
  • March 1, 2011 at 12:45 am
    Permalink

    i was 5yo when this happened,and all i can remember was this silly rhyme in our dialect which roughly translates “everybody, climb the coconut tree, if you fall down, just shout for cory” lol

    seriously, nothing has changed, we are still a nation of corrupt government. so what’s the cause for celebration?

    Reply
    • March 1, 2011 at 11:40 pm
      Permalink

      majority ng mga pilipino that includes mysefl loves to focus on how people play the role rather than the facts behind it.i used to believe ninoy aquino really made the difference pero nung nabasa ko to wala binago na nmn ni ms. connie ang mga pinaniniwalaan ko..kya minsan kapag me mga balita na duda ako antay tlga ako ng post ni miss connie what is her opinion para malamn ko kung pareho ba kmi hehehe…kse im no expert and i know i have the obligation na kahit papanu eh maghanap ng konting katotohanan sa mga nakikita at naririnig..at dahil isa ako sa masang naniniwala sa mga napapnuod ng kadramahan sa pulitika sa showbiz at kung anek anek pa.tama ba ako miss connie kung sasabihin ko ang media dito satin madrama din kase kapag nagrereport sila focus sila sa emotion ng pangyayari kesa magfocus sa facts ng news..kaya ang opinion ng public affected na ng way ng reporting nila.kya tamad na mag isip kse naibigay na sa kanila..kopyahan na lng ng opinion…ganun….

      Reply
  • March 1, 2011 at 4:30 am
    Permalink

    My sentiments exactly, Miss Connie. Bravo! Yearly, I ask myself "What is there to celebrate about EDSA?". What have we got to show for it? Wala! Wala! Wala!

    Reply
  • March 1, 2011 at 8:45 am
    Permalink

    i was 5yo when this happened,and all i can remember was this silly rhyme in our dialect which roughly translates "everybody, climb the coconut tree, if you fall down, just shout for cory" lol

    seriously, nothing has changed, we are still a nation of corrupt government. so what's the cause for celebration?

    Reply
  • March 2, 2011 at 7:40 am
    Permalink

    majority ng mga pilipino that includes mysefl loves to focus on how people play the role rather than the facts behind it.i used to believe ninoy aquino really made the difference pero nung nabasa ko to wala binago na nmn ni ms. connie ang mga pinaniniwalaan ko..kya minsan kapag me mga balita na duda ako antay tlga ako ng post ni miss connie what is her opinion para malamn ko kung pareho ba kmi hehehe…kse im no expert and i know i have the obligation na kahit papanu eh maghanap ng konting katotohanan sa mga nakikita at naririnig..at dahil isa ako sa masang naniniwala sa mga napapnuod ng kadramahan sa pulitika sa showbiz at kung anek anek pa.tama ba ako miss connie kung sasabihin ko ang media dito satin madrama din kase kapag nagrereport sila focus sila sa emotion ng pangyayari kesa magfocus sa facts ng news..kaya ang opinion ng public affected na ng way ng reporting nila.kya tamad na mag isip kse naibigay na sa kanila..kopyahan na lng ng opinion…ganun….

    Reply
  • March 14, 2011 at 5:10 am
    Permalink

    Ms. Connie, it's been a long time since I read your blog, hehe just want you to know. People Power?… What people power?.. As the other people who commented on this blog, I do not feel it. Same old, same old.. We don't need a hero to stand up for us, we just need the people of the Philippines to have the political will to stand up for their right. I know it is easier said than done. Na sa atin lang naman kasi diba yung susi ng pag babago.

    (Comment about the current President)
    Sabi ng kakilala ko na militar, si Mar Roxas naman daw talaga nagpapatakbo ng Pilipinas, puppet lang daw si PNoy at apat na oras lang daw nilalagi ni PNoy sa Malacañang. At si VP Binay na daw papalit sa current Pres. because, alam nyo na.. May mangyayari nanaman na something. Parang sa panahon lang ni Erap.

    Reply
  • March 25, 2011 at 10:54 am
    Permalink

    While I do not always agree with what Miss Connie writes, I always admire her for expressing her views, even when they may be unpopular.

    I’m glad that there is someone who writes about the things that we have spent a lot of time thinking of but never had the courage to say out loud.

    When I read her posts, I know that these are outpourings of a Filipina without an agenda. There is something VERY wrong in our country right now. I declined to vote last year because none of the candidates were worth voting for and the only one I could actually have voted for did not have a chance of winning.

    But it is true … the Filipino is very forgiving and quite forgetful.

    Which is just sad.

    Reply
    • March 25, 2011 at 5:40 pm
      Permalink

      “outpourings of a Filipina without an agenda”

      I’ll take that as a compliment. Thank you. :)

      Reply
  • March 25, 2011 at 6:54 pm
    Permalink

    While I do not always agree with what Miss Connie writes, I always admire her for expressing her views, even when they may be unpopular.

    I'm glad that there is someone who writes about the things that we have spent a lot of time thinking of but never had the courage to say out loud.

    When I read her posts, I know that these are outpourings of a Filipina without an agenda. There is something VERY wrong in our country right now. I declined to vote last year because none of the candidates were worth voting for and the only one I could actually have voted for did not have a chance of winning.

    But it is true … the Filipino is very forgiving and quite forgetful.

    Which is just sad.

    Reply
    • March 26, 2011 at 1:40 am
      Permalink

      "outpourings of a Filipina without an agenda"

      I'll take that as a compliment. Thank you. :)

      Reply
  • April 29, 2011 at 11:56 am
    Permalink

    Dear Connie,
    I am a student in the US taking a Philippine culture class, and my thought about the voting process with utang Na loob is the Filipino needs to look beyond a public bridge or roadway and look at values and consistency of policy.
    Let not your heart be troubled, we, too, have corruption here in the US gov. and do you want to know the sad part about it? I did a presentation on voter turn out at the polls on average mid term elections and do you know what I found? Only 22% of registered voters actually voted. Our presidential election in 2008 60% of registered voters voted. I don't know if this is the case in the Philippines as well but a change will not happen if one sits at home and waits for the wrong person to take office to complain about it. Vote! Vote! Vote! It is your right and urge others to do the same. Change does not come easy and I don’t have to tell Filipino’s that! It can be done educate and reinstate!!!!!
    Keep informing people Miss Connie it is people like you that will bring change!

    Reply

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